Meet the team

Prof. Dr. Klaus Dingwerth

Klaus Dingwerth is Professor of Political Science with a focus on the Political Theory of the Globalized and Digital Society at the University of St. Gallen and a Non-Resident Fellow with the Global Public Policy Institute in Berlin. His research interests lie at the intersection of global governance and political theory. His publications include The New Transnationlism: Transnational Governance and its Democratic Legitimacy (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007) and The Language of World Trade Politics: Unpacking the Terms of Trade (co-edited with Clara Weinhardt, Routledge, 2019) and International Organizations under Pressure: Legitimating Global Governance in Challenging Times (co-edited with Antonia Witt, Ina Lehmann, Ellen Reichel, and Tobias Weise, Oxford University Press, 2019)

Dr. phil. Anita Horn

Anita Horn is a post doctoral fellow at the School of Economics and Political Science, University of St Gallen. She also works as an analytical psychotherapist. Having obtained a BA in Political Science and an MA in Philosophy, she wrote her PhD in Political Philosophy funded by the Swiss National Foundation at the University of Zurich. Her time as a visiting scholar at Columbia University, New York deepened her focus on sociocritical analysis by combining psychological and philosophical perspectives. Her current project examines individual and social pathologies in the process of “digitalization” of everyday life.

Dr. Julian Eckl

As part of the SNF/DFG project on norms of differentiation, Julian Eckl is investigating the topic of global health. In addition, he is conducting an ethnographic project on central sites of global health politics, which he began during his time as a research fellow at the University of Hamburg. There he was also awarded the Hamburg Teaching Prize. Prior to his time in Hamburg, he received his doctorate degree in St. Gallen and studied in Munich and Cork. His main subject was Political Science, his minor subjects were Computer Science and Intercultural Communication. In his research, he also draws on areas such as public health, ethnology, history or science and technology research.

Roberta Fischli

Roberta Fischli is a research and teaching assistant at the Chair of Political Theory of the Globalized and Digital Society at the University of St. Gallen. She is enrolled in the doctoral program International Affairs and Political Economy (DIA) and currently develops her doctoral dissertation project on the implications of the data economy for freedom. Roberta studied Political Science and Modern History at the Universities of Zurich and Copenhagen, and holds an MA in Political Science. Roberta also works as a writer and freelance journalist and co-organizes ‘Karl Digital’, a public event series centered around the societal implications of digitalization. Roberta also advises student researches working on the data economy and its normative implications.

Simon Herr

Simon works as doctoral researcher in our SNF/DFG funded project on norms of differential treatment and rising powers. In his doctoral dissertation, Simon re-conceptualizes and measures climate responsibility. His work involves analysing and comparing different ways of interpreting, systematising, and measuring CBDR to provide a gauge for nationally determined contributions under the Paris Agreement. Simon holds a MA in Economics from the University of St. Gallen and a BA in Philosophy, Politics, and Economics from Lancaster University. He has previously worked on urban mobility at the Fraunhofer IAO in Stuttgart and in green banking at the GLS Bank in Bochum, Stuttgart, and Berlin.

Simon Pistor

Simon Pistor is a research and teaching assistant at the Chair of Political Theory of the Globalized and Digital Society at the University of St. Gallen. He is enrolled in the doctoral program International Affairs and Political Economy (DIA) at the University of St. Gallen. At the moment, Simon develops his doctoral dissertation project which seeks to combine normative insights from International Political Theory and empirical evidence under the conditions of globalization. Simon holds a MA in Political Theory and a BA in Political Science. He studied at the Goethe-University Frankfurt am Main, TU Darmstadt, and Virginia Tech. Simon also advises student researchers working on IPT, Critical Theory, and Cosmopolitanism.

Markus Rutsche

Markus Rutsche is a research assistant and PhD candidate at the Chair of Political Theory of the Globalized and Digital Society. He studied Political Science, Philosophy and Protestant Theology at the Universities of Heidelberg, Geneva and Tübingen, where he also obtained his MA degree. During his studies, he worked for the Tel Aviv and Washington DC offices of the Heinrich Böll Foundation. He has held various positions as a research assistant and lecturer in Tübingen and St. Gallen and currently serves as a co-editor of the Intergenerational Justice Review. Markus was a visiting research fellow at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in 2018 and  just completed his dissertation on the political thought of John Rawls.

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